The Diverse Book Tag

TAGS

Hey guys!

Today I decided to do The Diverse Book Tag. I was tagged by Jenna over at Fictional Neverland. If you are not following her, then you need to do so… NOW! Her blog is awesome!

I do try my best to find and read more diverse books over the years, but I will also be using books on my TBR for some questions as well. Let’s jump right in!


A BOOK STARRING A LESBIAN CHARACTER

Lies We Tell OurselvesIn 1959 Virginia, the lives of two girls on opposite sides of the battle for civil rights will be changed forever.

Sarah Dunbar is one of the first black students to attend the previously all-white Jefferson High School. An honors student at her old school, she is put into remedial classes, spit on and tormented daily.

Linda Hairston is the daughter of one of the town’s most vocal opponents of school integration. She has been taught all her life that the races should be kept separate but equal.

Forced to work together on a school project, Sarah and Linda must confront harsh truths about race, power and how they really feel about one another.

Boldly realistic and emotionally compelling, Lies We Tell Ourselves is a brave and stunning novel about finding truth amid the lies, and finding your voice even when others are determined to silence it.

 

A BOOK WITH A MUSLIM PROTAGONIST

Written in the StarsThis heart-wrenching novel explores what it is like to be thrust into an unwanted marriage. Has Naila’s fate been written in the stars? Or can she still make her own destiny?

Naila’s conservative immigrant parents have always said the same thing: She may choose what to study, how to wear her hair, and what to be when she grows up—but they will choose her husband. Following their cultural tradition, they will plan an arranged marriage for her. And until then, dating—even friendship with a boy—is forbidden. When Naila breaks their rule by falling in love with Saif, her parents are livid. Convinced she has forgotten who she truly is, they travel to Pakistan to visit relatives and explore their roots. But Naila’s vacation turns into a nightmare when she learns that plans have changed—her parents have found her a husband and they want her to marry him, now! Despite her greatest efforts, Naila is aghast to find herself cut off from everything and everyone she once knew. Her only hope of escape is Saif . . . if he can find her before it’s too late.

A BOOK SET IN LATIN AMERICA

Red GlassONE NIGHT SOPHIE and her parents are called to a hospital where Pedro, 6-year-old Mexican boy, is recovering from dehydration. Crossing the border into Arizona with a group of Mexicans and a coyote, or guide, Pedro and his parents faced such harsh conditions that the boy is the only survivor. Pedro comes to live with Sophie, her parents, and Sophie’s Aunt Dika, a refugee of the war in Bosnia. Sophie loves Pedro – her Principito, or Little Prince. But after a year, Pedro’s surviving family in Mexico makes contact, and Sophie, Dika, Dika’s new boyfriend, and his son must travel with Pedro to his hometown so that he can make a heartwrenching decision.

 


A BOOK ABOUT A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY

Girl StolenSixteen-year-old Cheyenne Wilder is sleeping in the back of the car while her stepmom fills a prescription for antibiotics. Before Cheyenne realizes what’s happening, the car is being stolen.

Griffin hadn’t meant to kidnap Cheyenne and once he finds out that not only does she have pneumonia, but that she’s blind, he really doesn’t know what to do. When his dad finds out that Cheyenne’s father is the president of a powerful corporation, everything changes–now there’s a reason to keep her.

How will Cheyenne survive this nightmare?

 


A SCIENCE-FICTION OR FANTASY BOOK WITH A POC PROTAGONIST

The Wrath and the DawnOne Life to One Dawn.

In a land ruled by a murderous boy-king, each dawn brings heartache to a new family. Khalid, the eighteen-year-old Caliph of Khorasan, is a monster. Each night he takes a new bride only to have a silk cord wrapped around her throat come morning. When sixteen-year-old Shahrzad’s dearest friend falls victim to Khalid, Shahrzad vows vengeance and volunteers to be his next bride. Shahrzad is determined not only to stay alive, but to end the caliph’s reign of terror once and for all.

Night after night, Shahrzad beguiles Khalid, weaving stories that enchant, ensuring her survival, though she knows each dawn could be her last. But something she never expected begins to happen: Khalid is nothing like what she’d imagined him to be. This monster is a boy with a tormented heart. Incredibly, Shahrzad finds herself falling in love. How is this possible? It’s an unforgivable betrayal. Still, Shahrzad has come to understand all is not as it seems in this palace of marble and stone. She resolves to uncover whatever secrets lurk and, despite her love, be ready to take Khalid’s life as retribution for the many lives he’s stolen. Can their love survive this world of stories and secrets?

A BOOK WRITTEN BY AN INDIGENOUS OR NATIVE AUTHOR

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time IndianSherman Alexie tells the story of Junior, a budding cartoonist growing up on the Spokane Indian Reservation. Determined to take his future into his own hands, Junior leaves his troubled school on the rez to attend an all-white farm town high school where the only other Indian is the school mascot. Heartbreaking, funny, and beautifully written, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, which is based on the author’s own experiences, coupled with poignant drawings that reflect the character’s art, chronicles the contemporary adolescence of one Native American boy as he attempts to break away from the life he thought he was destined to live.

 


A BOOK SET IN SOUTH ASIA

Bamboo PeopleNarrated by two teenage boys on opposing sides of the conflict between the Burmese government and the Karenni, one of Burma’s many ethnic minorities, this coming-of-age novel takes place against the political and military backdrop of modern-day Burma. Chiko isn’t a fighter by nature. He’s a book-loving Burmese boy whose father, a doctor, is in prison for resisting the government. Tu Reh, on the other hand, wants to fight for freedom after watching Burmese soldiers destroy his Karenni family’s home and bamboo fields. Timidity becomes courage and anger becomes compassion when the boys’ stories intersect.

 


A BOOK WITH A BIRACIAL PROTAGONIST

Everything, EverythingMy disease is as rare as it is famous. Basically, I’m allergic to the world. I don’t leave my house, have not left my house in seventeen years. The only people I ever see are my mom and my nurse, Carla.

But then one day, a moving truck arrives next door. I look out my window, and I see him. He’s tall, lean and wearing all black—black T-shirt, black jeans, black sneakers, and a black knit cap that covers his hair completely. He catches me looking and stares at me. I stare right back. His name is Olly.

Maybe we can’t predict the future, but we can predict some things. For example, I am certainly going to fall in love with Olly. It’s almost certainly going to be a disaster.

A BOOK STARRING A TRANSGENDER CHARACTER OR TRANSGENDER ISSUES

If I Was Your GirlAmanda Hardy is the new girl in school in Lambertville, Tennessee. Like any other girl, all she wants is to make friends and fit in. But Amanda is keeping a secret. There’s a reason why she transferred schools for her senior year, and why she’s determined not to get too close to anyone.

And then she meets Grant Everett. Grant is unlike anyone she’s ever met—open, honest, kind—and Amanda can’t help but start to let him into her life. As they spend more time together, she finds herself yearning to share with Grant everything about herself…including her past. But she’s terrified that once she tells Grant the truth, he won’t be able to see past it.

Because the secret that Amanda’s been keeping? It’s that she used to be Andrew.


Well there you have it. A great list of diverse books that you need to add to your TBR right now!

I TAG YOU

Ashley | JM | Samantha | Joan | Jananee | Lois | Sush | Danny

Until next time,

Sig New

TWITTER | GOOD READS | INSTAGRAM | BLOG LOVIN’

 

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19 thoughts on “The Diverse Book Tag

  1. Lies We Tell Ourselves sounds like a fantastic read! These kinds of lists always make it clear to me that I definitely could read more diversely. I think it’s something we could all probably work on. Anyways, great tag! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Ok Jesse, ok, you’ve taught me a lesson! I definitely do need to diversify my reading! I’m impressed with your reading list! I have been trying to complete this list for the past hour and I just can’t. I did ok until I got to the last three choices and then I bombed. I will post my pathetic attempt at this later, once I’ve recovered from the shame. I love your post though 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. The Wrath and the Dawn. ❤ I have just finished that duology and I am in love. Khalid and Shahrzad are among my top 10 OTP's. Such a great series.
    I have been trying to read more diverse books so this tag is ideal in extending my tbr pile.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I absolutely love being tagged on posts like these, but unfortunately, I don’t think I’ve read diversely enough to have answers for all the categories, so I guess I’ll do it once I have! But great post, Jesse! The only book I’ve read from your list is Everything, Everything! One of my favorites from 2015! Thanks for tagging, man! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Hi, Jesse!
    I love the books you picked. You certainly have great taste. 8/10 books I have either read or want to read ASAP 😀 The highest one on my list is If I Was Your Girl.

    By the way, I created this tag, but it was the first one I ever made, so I didn’t set the rules very clearly and forgot to mention to link back to me as part of the rules. haha, I’ve learned my lesson. x)
    Thanks for doing it!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Pingback: July 2016 Wrap Up! | Books at Dawn

  7. Pingback: The Ultimate Diverse Reading List: Over 300 Book Recommendations! | Read Diverse Books

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